AMERICAN SODA

BLASTERS

RESTORATION SPECIALISTS

 

MEDIA BLASTING


Media blasting is a general term used to describe the act of propelling very fine bits of material at high-velocity to clean or etch a surface. Sand used to be the most commonly used material, but since the lung disease silicosis is caused by extended inhalation of the dust created by the media, other materials are now used in its place. Any small, relatively uniform particles will work, such as steel grit, copper slag, titanium, garnet, corn cob, walnut shells, magnesium sulfate, baking soda, powdered abrasives, even bits of coconut shell. Due to the dangers of inhaling dust during the process,media lasting is carefully controlled, using an alternate air supply, protective wear, and proper ventilation.


The first media blasting process was patented in the US in 1870. As a cleaning method, it is often used for priming a surface for the application of paint or a sealant. When painting, one doesn't want to trap dust, dirt, bubbles, or other imperfections contained in a previous layer of paint, under the new layer. By launching small bits of abrasive at the surface at a high speed, all imperfections are knocked loose and can then be easily washed off, creating an incredibly smooth surface upon which to lay the new layer of paint. Media blasting may also be used for such projects as cleaning the hulls of ships or large structures such as the Golden Gate Bridge.


Serving Arizona

MONDAY - FRIDAY

8AM to 5PM

OFFICE:                     

623-434-9135

FAX:                        

480-633-3458